5 Terms to Help You Evaluate Your Front-Door Program and Partner

Defining-Front-Door-MarketingOver the years, we’ve worked with a multitude of clients within various industries, all of whom have needed some education, in some form, in front-door marketing. Instead of providing all of our sales collateral and presentations, we’ve listed five key terms (and their definitions according to PowerDirect) to help you frame a better understanding of front-door marketing, and how to evaluate future front-door partners.

1. Front-Door Marketing
(noun) A highly specialized and measurable discipline that uses creative, precisely targeted media to reach and engage consumers through one of the last uncluttered environments — their front door.

Contrary to popular opinion, front-door marketing isn’t just door hangers. Polybags, boxes, and express envelopes are among the different print materials and construction that can be delivered to the front door. In front-door marketing, the focus is on the uncluttered space, rather than the media type. Your front-door partner should be able to develop any type of front-door program for you — and not just using door hangers.

2. Block Groups
(noun) Formally known as US Census Block Groups, these are Census-defined territories of approximately 100 to 400 households, and typically smaller than a zipcode, which includes approximately 13,000 households.

Block group targeting and delivery is unique to front-door marketing because it allows for extremely targeted and efficient distribution, while still providing enough market coverage. Ask your front-door partner at what level they target and deliver (DMA, CBSA, zipcode, or block group) to determine overall program efficiency.

3. Reco or Counts
(noun) Short for “recommendations” and “household counts”, these data sheets outline the program’s targeting recommendation based on specific consumer demographics

Recos and counts are a good demonstration of a partner’s targeting capabilities and experience. What typically happens in the targeting analytics process is that the front-door partner will rank all the block groups in your desired market based on your ideal customer profile (or specific demographics) and select the “best block groups” for your campaign. Ask your front-door partner for counts or recos in a specific market; your front-door partner should be able to provide you with recommendations that include not only demographic, but also psychographic and expenditure information.

4. GPS Delivery
(noun) Delivery that can be tracked and verified via a global positioning system

The use of GPS technology varies across the front-door marketing industry. What doesn’t vary is the back-end reporting and analysis of the GPS “maps”, which log GPS coordinates and movements on a satellite map image. Ask your front-door partner to provide you with a post-campaign GPS map and analysis. Their GPS teams should be able to provide you with information on how fast the delivery occurred, any indications of abnormalities in delivery, and a grade for the overall delivery.

5. Overages
(noun) Block groups that are similar to program-selected block groups, and have been identified as “contingency” zones in the case that program-selected block groups cannot be delivered to.

Overages are basically contingency areas. Most front-door marketing companies recognize that not every city is a perfect delivery zone. Geographical limitations may prohibit delivery in certain block groups; thus, overages will address this challenge. Ask your front-door partner what limitations they have on delivery and what their policy is to address these limitations.

Are there any other front-door marketing terms you’ve encountered and don’t have a definition for? We’ll be happy to help you define them; just leave your comments below!

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